Best Stainable Wood Filler For Your Next Woodworking Project

Woodworkers are all over the map when it comes to what is the best stainable wood filler out there.

From popular brand names of actual "stainable wood filler" to much more primitive methods for getting the exact stain color to match your DIY project, there are several different opinions on the matter.

Quick Look: Top Stainable Wood Fillers

Filler

Quality

Price

Rating

Famowood Wood Filler

A

$

3M Bondo Wood Filler

A+

$$

Elmers Wood Filler

B

$

Bear with us here as we discuss your options.

Top Brand Name Stainable Wood Fillers

Famowood​ Wood Filler

famowood

Woodworkers have been using Famowood for several decades.

This stainable wood filler claims to spread smoothly into cracks and will repair both major and minor defects and problems in the wood you're working with.

In addition, it is not quick to crack and is easy to spread into the cracks and holes. The stain spreads evenly.

What We Like:

  • Dries very quickly
  • Can be used indoor or outdoor
  • Won't shrink or crack
  • Can be sanded, planed, drilled into

3M Bondo Wood Filler

bondo

Bondo is actually already colored in a medium brown color. However, it's still paintable and stainable.

In addition, it's quick to dry, making it possible for you to sand and paint within just a few minutes (15-25 to be exact). This means you can have your entire project complete in one day.

Bondo is used to repair small damage, but because it's a 2-step wood filler, you can also rebuild rotted wood or rebuild missing pieces of wood.

The repairs will last without cracking or shrinking.

What We Like:

  • Dries relatively quickly
  • Can help repair or cover up damaged wood
  • Won't shrink or crack

Elmer's Wood Filler

elmers

This Elmer's wood filler is to be used indoor for any issues, defects and holes in wood. Like those Elmer's glue sticks your kids use on crafts, it starts out purple, but dries white so that you know it's ready to stain, sand or paint.

It doesn't shrink or crack either, which is a must-have in stainable wood filler.

Some woodworkers say that the color is slightly off when staining, but it works pretty decently with lighter stains.

What We Like:

  • Goes on purple for great visibility
  • Stays true to size, no shrinking

Mohawk Wood Filler Kit

kit

This kit is crazy! This would be something you'd use only if you're downright serious about woodworking, as it's pricey.

However, it includes EVERYTHING you'll ever need to repair and fill the wood defects or mistakes.

Many say that this is the only way to go to get an accurate color when staining wood with wood filler. With all of the different colors, brushes, adhesives, etc. in the kit, you're sure to figure out the solution with this kit.

It also includes a dvd tutorial on how to properly stain and fill the wood you're working with. ​

DIY ideas for stainable wood filler

Many woodworkers say that you really cannot locate stainable wood filler that will actually be a perfect match for filling in nail holes or defects in the wood you're working with.​

In those cases, you might want to look to a DIY solution like this:​

​Mixing Fine Sawdust with Epoxy

Take the wood you're working with, and put it on a big piece of cardboard so that you can easily scrape up and collect the fine saw dust that accumulates from working with the wood. Then, pour the accumulated saw dust into a water bottle or some other type of container.​

Be sure to add enough saw dust to make the mixture extremely thick. Fill in the hole that you need to, and even if you're using 5-minute epoxy, let it cure for 20-25 minutes so that when you sand it down, it will work well.

In addition, be sure that you fill it more than full so that sanding is possible. This works beautifully!

Check out the step by step instructions in this video.

Other woodworkers, instead of using epoxy mixed with sawdust, use regular wood glue and mix that with fine saw dust from the wood they're working with.

In addition to these ideas, you may want to look into staining and tinting the filler rather than staining a patch you used to fill. It's much more accurate in matching to stain the filler ahead of time rather than trying to stain a patch you have already made. 

Make sure that you look at each type of filler, and depending on what kind of job you're doing and how much the filler-match matters, you can now make a very informed decision on what stainable wood filler is the best for you.